Garden Trends

How To Transform Your Yard In A Weekend

By Clive @DIYGarden | October 6, 2018
Image by Alexander Raths

How To Transform Your Yard In A Weekend

by Clive @DIYGarden October 6, 2018

How To Transform Your Yard In A Weekend

By Clive @DIYGarden | October 6, 2018

Despite the best of intentions and enthusiasm, sometimes the garden jobs can get away from us.

A busy lifestyle, or perhaps moving into a new property can mean you’re faced with a dirty, overgrown yard that no one enjoys spending time in.

Don’t give up on it – here are some ways to get your yard looking great in just one weekend.

Hook Up Your Pressure Washer

Patio slabs, decking, garden paths, walls and fences, the bird bath, kids’ playing equipment, and garden furniture all take a lot of beating from the weather. They end up looking dirty, and in the case of walking areas, slippery and dangerous.

If you’re not a fan of donning rubber gloves and wielding a scrubbing brush for hours on end, the best way to quickly spruce up your yard is pressure washing.

A pressure washer blasts away dirt, dust, and bird droppings from most surfaces. On a high power setting, it will remove weeds from cracks in slabs and polish off the layer of green slime and moss from your decking so it looks new again.

If you’ve got time, then give your car, bike, windowsill, and doorframes a quick going over too.

Sand Down And Oil Wooden Furniture

If your wooden furniture needs some love, you can jet wash it clean, then whip out your sander and give it a quick going over. A coat of linseed oil will dry quickly to create a lovely sheen.

Cut Grass And Sharpen Up The Edges

Lawn care is tedious, but it makes a huge difference. Dust off your lawn mower and take some time to mow grassy areas and clip back the edges.

If your in-laws have announced an intention to drop by and you don’t have time to mow the whole lawn, just clip the edges. Neat corners and border edges give the impression of tidiness.

Cut Back Overhanging Vegetation

Overhanging hedges and trees block out the sun, which prevents plants from getting enough light and makes footways slippery.

Cut back overhang with loppers. You’ll be surprised how even cutting back just a third lets in so much more light. Do look out for nesting birds before you start cutting, and if you spot any, just leave that section for a few weeks until they’ve fledged.

Border Care

Surface weeds, compacted soil, and stones make the border look messy, so turn over the soil around plants and pull out any obvious weeds.

Freshly turned soil gives a polished look to the border and you’ll inhale all those good soil microbes that boost your health too.

If the border edging has collapsed, take a sharp spade and cut a square of grass from the edging. Turn it around so the full green side becomes the new border edge – voila! The shabby edges will quickly backfill and you have a neat razor sharp borderline.

Rake Up Leaves

Autumn leaves get everywhere – in the guttering, stuck to the patio, and they cover damp grass so it rots.

Try to keep them confined to the edges of your yard at least. If you can bag leaf litter and pop them somewhere dry over winter, you’ll have leaf mulch in spring. This is known as ‘black gold’ and it’s perfect for mulching your borders.

Plant Up Pots According To The Season

Adding some color to your seating area makes your yard look cared for, even if the borders and lawn are a bit shabby.

Choose some evergreen staples and bright flowering plants to suit the season.

  • Spring – flowering bulbs and early shrubs like forsythia and spiraea
  • Summer – you have your pick of bedding plants
  • Autumn – try chrysanthemums, asters, and acers
  • Winter – holly, ivy and witch hazels look stunning

 Pressed For Time?

If all that’s too much for one weekend, the best plan is to concentrate on a seating area you can take pleasure from.

Jet wash it clean, cut back any overhangs, and pot up a few brightly colored scented plants. This small victory will inspire you to carry on next weekend when you can tackle the lawn and borders.

You’ll be up and running again in no time.

The above article was sponsored by DIY Garden. The information contained in this article may contain ads or advertorial opinions.
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